Making everyday life easier for the consumer

Soon running your daily errands will be quick and easy: Groceries you ordered will be automatically delivered to your door, or directly in your fridge. The same delivery also includes the party dress you ordered for yourself, and new football boots for your child.  Before heading back, the delivery vehicle picks up your recyclable cardboard and bottles, and perhaps gives your children a ride to soccer practice or piano lesson.

This is a future in which service package integration will make the consumer’s daily life much easier.  Instead of focusing on individual purchases, consumers will be able to choose which solutions they need in their everyday life, and manage these using a single service platform. Other items provided as a service include clothing, hobby equipment, tools and home decor. Using a service instead of buying offers better adaptability to each life situation and current needs.

Everyday Life as a service– everyday solutions from a single source

In the transition to a service economy, it makes sense for the service provider to offer serviceable, upgradeable high-quality products, which will extend the life cycle of products. Resources can be put to efficient use when efficient use of materials is in the consumer service provider’s interest. The service provider will also be responsible for the recycling of products that have reached the end of their life cycle.

In the future, consumers will be able to obtain services by using a single integrated platform. This makes it easier to run several errands in one go, blurring the boundaries between individual services. Furthermore, all the goods consumers currently own can be offered as a service. What would you think about having your seasonal wardrobe delivered to your doorstep?

A solution for running Everyday Life as a servicesimplifies data flow, and as the volume of data grows, relevant services can be suggested to consumers almost automatically. This makes it easy for the consumer to choose the services they need, and it makes their everyday life easier. Better flow of information makes service provision a profitable business. To make everyday service logistics efficient and optimally suited to the consumers’ needs, products and services from multiple companies should be brought to the consumer in a single delivery.

Think differently, benefit more!

This is a revolutionary idea that requires a rather dramatic change in our thinking. To make them attractive, services offered should be superior in comparison with the existing ones. Understanding consumers, their daily activities and things that create value for them – and demand sacrifices – is a core element of development efforts. VTT’s AARRE project studied these carefully and created a customer’s value path to illustrate the value creation process and to provide a tool for companies.

Experimenting with various tried and tested services such as car and apartment sharing services will gradually drive changes in the way we think. Companies should embrace this opportunity to introduce experimental business models. Experiments like the provision of tools as a service can help to understand what the consumers are ready to accept and what their real needs are. Pilot projects could be launched to test the ecological benefits of the service.

Reliability is everything

Everyday Life as as serviceconcept offers superior value to the consumer, since the service can be taught to anticipate their needs and build a customised service portfolio for each consumer. Having a single service platform to cater to the needs of an individual consumer or families means that an enormous amount of confidential data will pile up in the service. The more information consumers are willing to disclose, the better and more tailored service they are likely to receive. It is therefore essential to ensure the reliability of the service to make it attractive. And because no two consumers are alike, a number of different options for limiting the collection and use of data must be provided.

The practical implementation of the model is still a long way away, and requires considerable development efforts. One of the key requirements is a mindset that embraces the shift away from ownership. Just imagine how services could change our daily lives!

 

Maria Antikainen VTT
Maria Antikainen

Principal Scientist
maria.antikainen(a)vtt.fi
@MariaAntikainen


Anna Aminoff VTTAnna Aminoff

Principal Scientist
anna.aminoff(a)vtt.fi
@AminoffAnna


outikettunen

Outi Kettunen
Senior Scientist
outi.kettunen(a)vtt.fi

 

The ABC of plastics in the circular economy is a series of five blog posts exploring the world of plastics. The series discusses bioplastics, plastics recycling and the related business operations, as well as the future of the circular economy. And last but not least – mythbusting! 

Digitalisation accelerates the circular economy

When talking about the circular economy, the role of digitalisation is almost always mentioned. The deployment of digital solutions may reduce the use of resources and facilitate the implementation of circular economy systems. However, as yet not much research has been done on how digitalisation enables the transition to a circular economy in practice. The CloseLoop strategic research project of the Academy of Finland systematically assesses challenges associated with the development of new business models, and brainstorms new circular economy business models and concepts for Finnish companies. These concepts are developed and tested in collaboration with companies and stakeholders, including end-users and consumers.

Digitalisation may provide assistance for achieving three objectives of the circular economy. The digitalisation of the industrial sector increases resource efficiency, helps to close the loop of material cycles and contributes to keeping materials in use for a longer time. Intelligent solutions enable, for example, the reduction of energy consumption, optimisation of logistics chains and more efficient use of capacity. Digitalisation can be used to gain access to material-specific data and resource consumption, which enables the product life cycle to be optimised for circular economy solutions. Good examples of this include Resq Club and Lunchie, which offer restaurant food for consumers through a digital platform. They reduce food waste by providing an easy way to buy food that would otherwise go to waste.  eRENT  offers companies a platform for the digital sharing and tracking of machines and devices, making it possible to improve their usage rates.

Circular economy systems with interconnected cycles often contain large amounts of data. Digitalisation offers new ways to collect and use it in real time. This data can be put to use when decisions need to be made about the phases of the product’s life cycle, reuse of waste materials, logistical arrangements and the operators needed in the value network. For example,  Konecranes offers warehouse management as a service that includes remote monitoring and preventive equipment maintenance and advanced digitalisation, enabling the monitoring of the entire supply chain. The solution allows Konecranes customers to efficiently provide their suppliers with information on warehouse usage levels.

In the circular economy, the coordination of materials and information flows is of crucial importance. Information on the quantity and quality of products and the raw materials they contain must be collected, stored and used efficiently. It must be possible to do this in a reliable and transparent manner, for which such methods as block chain technology may provide a solution. Digital technologies enable data storage combined with materials and the use of waste as a resource.

Digitalisation comes with a lot of challenges

The key challenges of digitalisation are related to business models, data ownership, data sharing, data integration, collaboration and competence. Issues related to the availability and ownership of data are of crucial importance. There are also challenges related to the sharing of data between competitors, protection of privacy, the IPR rights and confidence building. Integration of the large amounts of data owned by various operators is also needed, because the management of data flows is also a big challenge.

Other important issues include the organisation of cooperation between different partners, the definition of joint processes, search for suitable partners and pooling of different areas of competence. The pooling of the competences in information and communication technology and sustainable development also has its own challenges. At the moment, many organizations lack sufficient competence related to the basic concepts of the circular economy and sustainable business models.

Hackathons, training and research projects promote cooperation across disciplines

Cooperation, networking, increased transparency and the provision of information are key methods for promoting digitalisation. Collaboration can be practiced by sharing expertise between organisations and pooling competences between different actors. The operators should come from different fields and include both small and large organisations. In training, the cooperation between schools and enterprises could be increased. Various competitions and hackathons could be increasingly used for cooperation purposes. Participation in research and development projects is also a good way of creating cooperation networks.

It is important to involve consumers or end-users in the planning and implementation of a service, because consumers themselves function as service providers in many services that use platforms. In such a case, getting a critical mass involved in the process from the outset is of paramount importance, and the service must offer a first-rate solution to consumer needs in terms of both attractiveness and usability. One example is Zadaa, which provides consumers with a mobile application that makes it easy to put used clothes up for sale and to find clothes that fit. Digital solutions make it possible to reach consumers and end users in a more efficient way than before. It is important to note that instead of the earlier one-way communication, the solutions needed today must allow end-users to give feedback on products and services.

Read more: www.closeloop.fi

 

Maria Antikainen VTT

 

Maria Antikainen
Principal Scientist
maria.antikainen(a)vtt.fi
@MariaAntikainen

 

Teuvo Uusitalo VTT

 

Teuvo Uusitalo
Senior Scientist, VTT
teuvo.uusitalo(a)vtt.fi
@TeuvoU

 

 

Kiertotalous_digitalisaatio

Under the theme “Digitalisation as enabler of the circular economy”, we organized a workshop at the From Waste to Valuables event held at the Hotel Torni of Tampere on 23 November 2017. It was attended by 62 representatives of business and research organisations. The workshop presented three innovative examples in which digitalisation forms an essential part of the operations: Uusioaines Oy, Hiedanranta and Resq Club. We discussed in small groups how digitalisation contributes to the circular economy, what challenges this entails and how they can be solved

Digitalisaatio vauhdittaa kiertotaloutta

Digitalisaation rooli tulee esille lähes aina puhuttaessa kiertotaloudesta. Digitaalisten ratkaisujen käyttöönotto voi vähentää resurssien käyttöä ja helpottaa kiertotalouden järjestelmien toteuttamista. Vielä on kuitenkin vähän tutkimusta siitä, miten käytännössä digitalisaatio mahdollistaa siirtymisen kiertotalouteen. 

Digitalisaatio voi vauhdittaa täyttämään kiertotalouden kolme tavoitetta. Teollisuuden digitalisaatio lisää resurssitehokkuutta, auttaa sulkemaan materiaalien kierron kehän sekä edesauttaa pitämään materiaalit pidempään käytössä. Älykkäät ratkaisut mahdollistavat esimerkiksi energiankulutuksen vähentämisen, logistiikkaketjujen optimoinnin ja kapasiteetin hyödyntämisen tehokkaammin. Digitalisaation avulla voidaan saada pääsy materiaalikohtaisiin tietoihin ja resurssien kulutukseen, mikä mahdollistaa tuotteiden elinkaaren optimoinnin kiertotalouden ratkaisuihin. Kuluttajille digitaalisen alustan kautta ravintolaruokaa tarjoavat  Resq Club  ja Lunchie vähentävät ruokahävikkiä  tarjoamalla helpon tavan ostaa muuten hävikiksi päätyvää ruokaa. eRENT  tarjoaa yrityksille koneiden ja laitteiden digitaalista jakamis- ja seuranta-alustaa. Palvelun avulla on mahdollista parantaa koneiden ja laitteiden käyttöastetta.

Kiertotalouden järjestelmät, joilla on toisiinsa liittyvät kierrot, sisältävät usein suuria määriä dataa. Digitalisaatio tarjoaa uusia keinoja kerätä ja käyttää sitä reaaliaikaisesti. Dataa voidaan hyödyntää, kun on tehtävä päätöksiä tuotteiden elinkaaren vaiheista, jätemateriaalien uudelleenkäytöstä, logistisista järjestelystä ja arvoverkossa tarvittavista toimijoista. Esimerkiksi Konecranes tarjoaa varastonhallintaa palveluna, johon kuuluu etäseuranta ja laitteiden ennakoivat huollot sekä pitkälle viety digitalisaatio, joka mahdollistaa koko toimitusketjun seurannan. Ratkaisun avulla Konecranesin asiakkaat pystyvät välittämään omille toimittajilleen tehokkaasti tietoa varaston täyttöasteesta. 

Materiaalien ja tietovirtojen yhteensovittaminen kiertotaloudessa on ratkaisevan tärkeää. Tietoja tuotteiden määrästä ja laadusta sekä niiden sisältämistä raaka-aineista on kerättävä, säilytettävä ja hyödynnettävä tehokkaasti. Tämä on voitava  tehdä luotettavasti ja läpinäkyvästi, mihin esimerkiksi lohkoketjuteknologia voi tarjota ratkaisun. Digitaaliset teknologiat mahdollistavat tietojen säilyttämisen yhdistettynä materiaaleihin ja mahdollistavat jätteen hyödyntämisen resurssina. 

Digitalisaatioon liittyy runsaasti haasteita 

Digitalisaation keskeiset haasteet liittyvät liiketoimintamalleihin, tiedon omistukseen, tietojen jakamiseen, tietojen integrointiin, yhteistyöhön ja osaamisvaatimuksiin. Datan saatavuus ja datan omistajuuteen liittyvät kysymykset ovat ratkaisevan tärkeitä. Haasteita liittyy myös datan jakamiseen kilpailijoiden välillä, yksityisyyden suojaan, IPR- oikeuksiin ja luottamuksen rakentamiseen. Tarvitaan myös useiden toimijoiden omistamien suurien tietomäärien integrointia, sillä tietovirtojen hallinnointi on myös iso haaste.  

Tärkeää on myös yhteistyön järjestäminen eri kumppanien välillä, yhteisten prosessien määrittely, sopivien yhteistyökumppaneiden etsintä ja eri osaamisalueiden yhdistäminen.  Haasteita liittyy tieto- ja viestintätekniikan ja kestävän kehityksen osaamisen yhdistämiseen. Tällä hetkellä kiertotalouden ja kestävän liiketoimintamallien peruskäsitteiden osaaminen on monessa organisaatiossa puutteellista. 

Hackathonit, koulutus ja tutkimusprojektit edistävät yhteistyötä yli rajojen 

Yhteistyö, verkottuminen, avoimuuden lisääminen ja tiedon tarjoaminen ovat keskeisiä keinoja edistää digitalisaatiota. Yhteistoimintaa voidaan tehdä jakamalla organisaatioiden välistä asiantuntemusta ja yhdistämällä osaamista eri toimijoiden välillä. Toimijoiden olisi oltava eri aloilta ja koostuttava pienistä ja suurista organisaatioista. Koulutuksessa koulujen ja yritysten välistä yhteistyötä voitaisiin lisätä. Erilaisia kilpailuja ja hackathoneja voitaisiin käyttää yhä enemmän yhteistyöhön. Myös osallistuminen tutkimus- ja kehityshankkeisiin on hyvä keino luoda yhteistyöverkostoja. 

Kuluttajien tai loppukäyttäjien ottaminen mukaan palvelun suunnitteluun ja toteutukseen on tärkeää, koska monissa alustoja hyödyntävissä palveluissa kuluttajat itse toimivat palveluntuottajina. Tällöin kriittisen massan saaminen alusta lähtien mukaan on ensiarvoisen tärkeää, ja palvelun tulee olla sekä houkuttelevuudeltaan että käytettävyydeltään ensiluokkainen kuluttajien tarpeisiin. Yksi esimerkki on Zadaa, joka tarjoaa kuluttajille mobiilisovellusta, jolla on helppo laittaa myyntiin käytettyjä vaatteita ja löytää itselleen sopivia vaatteita. Digitaaliset ratkaisut mahdollistavat kuluttajien ja loppukäyttäjien tavoittamisen entistä tehokkaammin. Tärkeää on huomioida, että entisen yksisuuntaisen viestinnän sijaan tarvitaan ratkaisuja, joilla loppukäyttäjät voivat antaa palautetta tuotteista ja palveluista.  

Maria Antikainen VTT

 

Maria Antikainen
Principal Scientist
maria.antikainen(a)vtt.fi
@MariaAntikainen

 

Teuvo Uusitalo VTT

 

Teuvo Uusitalo
Senior Scientist, VTT
teuvo.uusitalo(a)vtt.fi
@TeuvoU

 

Järjestimme From Waste to Valuables tapahtumassa 23.11.2017 Tampereen Torni-hotellissa “Digitalisaatio kiertotalouden mahdollistajana” -näkökulmaan liittyen työpajan, johon osallistui 62 yritys- ja tutkimusorganisaatioiden edustajaa. Työpajassa esiteltiin kolme innovatiivista esimerkkiä, joissa digitalisaatio on keskeinen osa toimintaa:  Uusioaines Oy, Hiedanranta sekä Resq Club. Keskustelimme pienryhmissä , miten digitalisaatio edistää kiertotaloutta ja mitä haasteita tähän liittyy ja miten ne voidaan ratkaista.  

Kiertotalous_digitalisaatio

Suomen Akatemian strategisen tutkimuksen CloseLoop-hankkeessa arvioidaan systemaattisesti uusien liiketoimintamallien kehittämiseen liittyviä haasteita sekä ideoidaan uusia kiertotalouden liiketoimintamalleja ja konsepteja suomalaisille yrityksille. Konsepteja kehitetään ja testataan yhdessä yritysten ja sidosryhmien, kuten loppukäyttäjien ja kuluttajien, kanssa.

www.closeloop.fi 

Muovien kiertotalouden ABC: Kuluttajan arki helpottuu kiertotaloudessa

Pian arkesi helpottuu: ruoat tulevat automaattitilauksella tarpeen mukaan kotiovelle tai suoraan jääkaappiin, samalla kyydillä tulevat tilaamasi kevätjuhla-asu sekä uudet nappikset lapsellesi. Paluumatkalla kyytiin lähtevät kierrätettävät pahvit, pullot ja ehkä lapsesikin harrastuksiinsa.

Tämä on tulevaisuutta, jossa kuluttajan arki muuttuu sujuvammaksi, kun palvelukokonaisuudet integroituvat toisiinsa.  Sen sijaan että kuluttajat pohtisivat, millaisia yksittäisiä hankintoja tekisivät, he voivat valita millaisia ratkaisuja kaipaavat arkeensa ja hallita näitä yhdeltä palvelualustalta. Palveluna tulevat myös vaatteet, harrastusvälineet, työkalut sekä asunnon sisustus, mahdollistaen niiden mukautumisen kätevästi elämäntilanteen ja tarpeiden mukaan.

Arki palveluna – arkielämän ratkaisut yhdestä paikasta

Siirryttäessä palvelutalouteen palveluiden tuottajalle on järkevää tarjota laadukkaita, huollettavia ja päivitettäviä tuotteita mitä kautta tuotteiden elinkaari pitenee. Resurssit saadaan hyödynnettyä tehokkaasti kuluttajapalveluiden avulla kun palveluntarjoajan intressinä on materiaalien tehokas käyttö. Samalla palveluntuottaja vastaa elinkaarensa loppuun tulleen tuotteen kierrättämisestä.

Koska kuluttajat voivat saada tulevaisuudessa palvelut yhden integroidun alustan kautta, hoituu useampi tarve yhdellä kertaa ja yksittäisten palvelujen rajat hämärtyvät. Kaikki kuluttajan tällä hetkellä vielä omistamat tavarat voidaan tulevaisuudessa tarjota palveluna. Miltä kuulostaisi vaikkapa vuodenajan mukaan vaihtuva vaatemallisto kotiin toimitettuna?

Arki palveluna -tyyppisen ratkaisun avulla tiedonkulku paranee, ja lisääntyneen tiedon avulla kullekin sopivia palveluita voidaan ehdottaa melko automaattisesti. Tämä tekee palveluiden valitsemisesta ja samalla arjesta vaivatonta. Tiedonkulun paraneminen tekee palveluiden tarjoamisesta kuluttajille kannattavaa liiketoimintaa. Esimerkkinä arjen logistiikka voidaan saada riittävän tehokkaaksi ja kuluttajan tarpeisiin parhaiten sopivaksi, kun kuluttajalle tuodaan samalla kertaa kerralla usean eri yrityksen tuotteita ja palveluita.

Ajatellaan toisin -ja hyödytään enemmän!

Idea on mullistava ja vaatii suuren muutoksen ajattelumalleissa. Palveluiden tulee olla ylivertaisia verrattuna aiempiin, jo olemassa oleviin ratkaisuihin, jotta ne ovat houkuttelevia. Kehittämistyössä keskeistä on ymmärtää kuluttajia, heidän päivittäistä arjen toimintaa ja sitä mikä erilaisissa ratkaisuissa luo kuluttajille arvoa -ja toisaalta vaatii uhrauksia. Juuri tätä on  tutkittu VTT:n  AARRE-hankkeessa , jossa mm. luotiin asiakkaan arvopolku arvonluomisen hahmottamiseksi ja työvälineeksi yrityksille.

Erilaisten hyväksi havaittujen palveluiden kokeileminen ja käyttö – vaikkapa auton ja asunnon jakamispalvelut- vie ajattelun muutosta läpi askel askeleelta. Yrityksiltä tarvitaankin rohkeita liiketoimintamallikokeiluja. Tällaisten kokeilujen, kuten tarjoamalla työvälineet palveluna kautta pystytään selvittämään, mihin kuluttajat ovat valmiita ja mitä todellisia tarpeita heillä on. Piloteilla voidaan testata myös palvelun ympäristöystävällisyyttä.

Luotettavuus avainasemassa

Arki palveluna -ratkaisulla voidaan tarjota ylivertaista arvoa kuluttajille, koska oppiva palvelu pystyy ennakoimaan kuluttajien tarpeet ja muodostamaan niistä räätälöidyn kokonaisuuden. Kun kaikki yksittäisen kuluttajan tai perheiden tarpeet tyydytetään yhden palvelukokonaisuuden kautta, kertyy palveluun valtava määrä luottamuksellista tietoa. Mitä enemmän kuluttaja on valmis kertomaan, sitä paremman palvelukokonaisuuden hän luultavasti saa. Tästä syystä palvelun luotettavuus on keskeisessä roolissa, jotta se olisi houkutteleva. Koska kuluttajat ovat hyvin erilaisia, on tarjottava myös moninaiset mahdollisuudet rajoittaa kerättävää tietoa ja sen hyödyntämistä.

Tulevaisuuden Arki palveluna -mallin toteutuminen on vielä pitkän kehitystyön päässä. Yksi osa-alue on oman ajattelumme muuttuminen pois omistamiskeskeisyydestä. Mieti jo nyt, miten palvelut voisivat muuttaa arkeamme!

Maria Antikainen VTT
Maria Antikainen

Principal Scientist
maria.antikainen(a)vtt.fi
@MariaAntikainen


Anna Aminoff VTTAnna Aminoff

Principal Scientist
anna.aminoff(a)vtt.fi
@AminoffAnna


outikettunen

Outi Kettunen
Senior Scientist
outi.kettunen(a)vtt.fi

 

Muovien kiertotalouden ABC on viisiosainen blogisarja, jossa sukelletaan muovien maailmaan. Sarjassa käsitellään biomuoveja, muovien kierrätystä ja liiketoimintaa, sekä kiertotalouden tulevaisuuden visioita. Myyttien murtamista unohtamatta! 

Logistics is challenging in a circular economy

Circular economy is growing. We hear an increasing amount of stories about both successful and failed business models. Logistics plays a key role in the success of new business models for circular economy. At the same time, the required logistics poses a challenge, since it is significantly different from current operating models and logistic structures. How can the logistics of circular economy be made efficient, smooth and reasonably priced in Finland?

VTT’s recent AARRE project studied logistics and associated networks from the perspective of various business models for circular economy. The keys to functional future logistics are improving the sharing of information, close collaboration between companies and consumers, matching logistic infrastructure to the needs of circular economy and creating novel logistic services.

What is logistics like in circular economy and what challenges are involved?

In circular economy, materials will not end up as waste. Instead, they circulate within and between different supply chains, and are often transformed. The logistics of circular economy faces several challenges, such as poor predictability of material streams, small batches, low financial value of the material and variation of the material and its quality. For example, how can we transport low-value material cost-efficiently, ecologically and at the right time to a factory that manufactures products from secondary raw materials? Logistics will also grow in importance as companies and consumers switch from ownership to the use of services. How can one obtain a shared steam cleaner or a rented welding machine easily and economically, and how does the return logistics work?

Cost-efficient and ecological supply chain management will be a fundamental requirement of a well-functioning circular economy. According to companies working in circular economy, the logistics costs of circular economy are, for the most part, too high. The supply chain is missing services and operators. Collaboration between companies and segments is still low. In many cases, these shortcomings form an obstacle for new business in circular economy, or impair its profitability significantly.

How to respond to the challenges?

One of the key factors is the use of digitalisation in all phases of the supply chain, from the designer’s desk to return logistics. Circular economy highlights the importance of efficient control of material streams: accurate monitoring, traceability and novel logistics solutions. Building functional logistics requires collaboration among the parties, including cross-segment collaboration and co-operation between competitors. Legislation should also support logistic solutions of circular economy, for example by allowing more flexible intermediate storage for waste that will end up as secondary raw material.

Check list for circular economy logistics

Below is a summary of key factors identified in the AARRE project, and good practices for responding to the associated challenges.

Collaboration and the lack of collaboration in the network

  • Who are your key partners? Increase collaboration with them by developing new operating methods together.
  • Invest in establishing trust.
  • What information is critical for the logistics of circular economy? Create new ways of sharing this information.
  • If necessary, find partners outside your segment.

Digitalisation! What can you do with it?

  • Digitalisation will be an important enabler of the management of the supply chain (circle) of circular economy
  • Built-in ID tags detailing the content and usage history of a product will help in the refurbishing of products and reuse of product materials.
  • Information about location and needs improve the predictability and transparency of streams.
  • Various platform solutions enable material streams to be connected between parties, which improves the efficient utilisation of storage and transport capacity.
  • Forecast return streams by leveraging Big Data and information obtained from consumers themselves.

Logistic costs

  • Join forces with local actors. Combining volumes across sectors increases the efficiency of transport and warehousing.
  • Use your transport capacity at its maximum capacity. This too requires collaboration across companies and sectors.
  • Leverage digitalisation.

Efficiency or inefficiency of the entire supply chain

  • Actions that support the logistics of circular economy can be made already at the product design phase.
  • Encourage consumers to participate in return logistics by adopting a use-based business model or awarding users for returns.
  • Study start-up companies to get ideas about novel supply chain arrangements.

Logistics service providers as pioneers of circular economy

Circular economy requires a large number of new services from logistics companies. Recycled materials need flexible, versatile, correctly located or mobile storage services. Consumers are predicted to adopt a more active role, which creates more business opportunities, for example in trade between consumers. Logistics of circular economy needs a wide range of IT services, for example utilisation of data from sensors along the delivery circle, and a smarter combination of transport needs. The logistics of circular economy will also need a significant amount of new technologies. Development of services serves to promote wide-scale adoption of circular economy, while opening significant business opportunities for logistics and technology companies both in Finland and in export markets.

For more information, please visit:  www.vtt.fi/sites/AARRE
or follow on Twitter @AarreResearch

outikettunen


Outi Kettunen
Senior Scientist
outi.kettunen(a)vtt.fi
Twitter: @outi_kettunen

 

Maria Antikainen VTT


Maria Antikainen

Senior Scientist
maria.antikainen(a)vtt.fi
Twitter: @MariaAntikainen

 

 

Anna Aminoff VTT
Anna Aminoff 
Erikoistutkija
anna.aminoff(a)vtt.fi
Twitter: @AminoffAnna

 

 

Headed by VTT, the AARRE project created new, user-driven circular economy business activities. The project was a networked research project (2015–2017) being undertaken in partnership with the business sector, with Tekes as the main funder. In addition to VTT, the other research organisations involved were the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE) and the Consumer Society Research Centre of the University of Helsinki. The partners in the AARRE project were Lassila & Tikanoja, Destaclean, Kierrätysverkko, CoreOrient, Eurokangas, Not Innovated Here, as well as the Chemical Industry Federation of Finland, and the Federation of Finnish Technology Industries. The AARRE project ended on 30 November 2017.

How can industry be included in the sharing economy?

With the success of innovative ventures such as the carpooling platform BlaBlaCar, and the shared office environment WorkAround, the sharing economy is turning into a booming business for B2C. The concept of sharing  goods and services is perfectly suited to consumers who would rather handle their business themselves than go through a middleman. But how would it be possible to get the B2B sector involved?

The Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment estimated that the sharing economy in Finland will be worth (TEM 9/2017) 1.3 billion euros in 2020. Based on the report, the biggest sectors are crowdfunding, peer-to-peer mobility and car sharing, and household management and other micro tasks.  These calculations are strongly based on the current situation in which the sharing economy is mainly B2C business. However, there is one area that seems to be lagging behind B2C when it comes to the sharing economy: B2B.

 

Sharing economy refers to a common or communal economy that includes the production, consumption and use of commodities. It is based on temporary access instead of ownership, by utilizing the development of technology and the popularity of social media, such as sharing platforms. Since the B2B sector does not function on the same peer-to-peer business model that suits B2C, it makes sense that this sector has not yet seen as much success in the sharing economy. Different drivers, such as the economic situation, facilitate the need to share. Furthermore, change of mindset and existing practices in companies towards the sharing economy require progress, which can be challenging and take time. However, as technology develops, the B2B sector is looking to evolve in a way that will also allow it to partake in the lucrative sharing economy. The long-term vision is that current industrial value networks will evolve into business ecosystems in which the resources of individual companies can be shared on demand, making the network more responsive and efficient.

Platforms as enablers

The platforms are enablers for the B2B sharing economy. New business rules of the platform economy include generating network value, enabling of scale-up, and asymmetric competition in which companies pursue market opportunities with different resources and approaches. The ideal platform ecosystem in the B2B sharing economy includes 1) external resource orchestration instead of controlling internal resources, 2) external interactions between producers and customers instead of internal optimization, and 3) focusing on ecosystem value instead of on individual customers. The sharing business models are often triadic models consisting of a service enabler (platform), a service provider (supply / owner) and the customer (demand / seeker).

share_eng

Unique business models that maximize the utilization of idle assets differentiate the sharing economy from traditional business models. Most sharing economy businesses use online platforms or applications for collecting and sharing real-time data, and maximizing the use of assets. Based on the platform guidelines, digital leaders design and optimize platform ecosystems that scale exponentially without incurring the diminishing returns typically associated with traditional business models. The shift towards sharing economy business models is a big step for traditional companies, and new knowledge is needed to advance the transformation.

Benefits and challenges in the B2B sharing economy

Capture_eng
SHARE -research project

B2B sharing economy in the industrial context is researched in the SHARE -research project. The aim of the project is to create and demonstrate a digital sharing platform concept for a circular economy business ecosystem in which collaborating industrial organizations can easily co-innovate and share knowledge, production capacity, resources, services and logistic networks through interoperable systems, connected intelligent objects and blockchain technology. We are designing a set of rapid experimentations and initial solution designs for a sharing economy platform, testing and analyzing the designed solutions and analyzing in-depth sharing economy experiments. We are also organizing a series of workshops for advancing sharing economy knowledge and solutions, and analyzing business potential opportunities and business models.

For more information, please visit: www.vtt.fi/share

Salla Paajanen
Research Scientist, VTT
salla.paajanen(a)vtt.fi
Twitter: @PaajanenSalla

Anna Aminoff
Senior Scientist, VTT
anna.aminoff(a)vtt.fi
Twitter: @AminoffAnna

Maria Antikainen
Senior Scientist, VTT
maria.antikainen(a)vtt.fi
Twitter: @MariaAntikainen

This is the first text of a blog series addressing topics related to the SHARE -research project.